Monthly Archives: August 2017

Jackson List: Video of Jackson Center conference on Immigration, June 23, 2017

On June 23, 2017, the Robert H. Jackson Center in Jamestown, New York, hosted a conference, “How ‘Far Gone’ Are We Now?:  Immigration, Security & American Values, from Justice Jackson’s Time to Our Own.”

The conference title asked a timely question.  It incorporates a phrase from this concluding passage of Justice Jackson’s dissenting opinion in Shaughnessy, District Director of Immigration & Naturalization v. United States ex rel. Ignatz Mezei, a 1953 U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding as constitutional the broad statutory powers of the government to deport a non-citizen:

“Congress has ample power to determine whom we will admit to our shores and by what means it will effectuate its exclusion policy. The only limitation is that it may not do so by authorizing United States officers to take without due process of law the life, the liberty or the property of an alien who has come within our jurisdiction; and that means he must meet a fair hearing with fair notice of the charges.  It is inconceivable to me that this measure of simple justice and fair dealing would menace the security of this country. No one can make me believe that we are that far gone.”

The conference video now is posted on YouTube, in the following segments–

Three morning session lectures:

John Q. Barrett delivering the inaugural Alan Y. Cole Memorial Lecture, “Robert H. Jackson on Immigrants, Citizens, Power & Liberty”

Lucas Guttentag, Professor of the Practice of Law, Stanford Law School, and Distinguished Senior Fellow & Lecturer, Yale Law School, and former Senior Counselor to the Secretary, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and founder and former director ACLU Immigrants’ Rights Project, lecturing on “Sweeping Power & Shallow Rights: A Historical Perspective on Immigration Regulation and Constitutional Protections”

Rick Su, Professor of Law, University at Buffalo School of Law, lecturing on “Sanctuary or Force Multiplier?: Local Involvement in Federal Immigration Enforcement”

The lunchtime Keynote lecture:

Theodore M. Shaw, Julius L. Chambers Distinguished Professor of Law & Director of the Center for Civil Rights, University of North Carolina School of Law, and former Director-Counsel & President of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc., lecturing on “Uncharted Territory: The Existential Threat to the American Republic”

Two afternoon session lectures:

Joyce White Vance, Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law, University of Alabama School of Law, and former United States Attorney, Northern District of Alabama (2009-2017), delivering a lecture, “The Role of the Prosecutor in Protecting Civil Rights & Keeping Communities Safe”

Margo Schlanger, Henry M. Butzel Professor of Law, University of Michigan, and former U.S. Department of Homeland Security Officer for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, lecturing on “Civil Rights at the Border: National Security, Border Screening, & the Muslim Ban”

In addition, the entire morning session (welcoming remarks from Susan Moran Murphy, Jackson Center president & CEO; lectures by John Barrett, Lucas Guttentag, and Rick Su; audience-speaker Q&A; and me adjourning the session) is here:

And the entire afternoon session (introductions; lectures by Joyce White Vance and Margo Schlanger; audience-speaker Q&A; and concluding remarks) is here:

Please view these important, expert, challenging discussions on topics that matter to each of us, and please share this information and these links widely.

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This post was emailed to the Jackson List, a private but entirely non-selective email list that reaches many thousands of subscribers around the world. I write to it periodically about Justice Robert H. Jackson, the Supreme Court, Nuremberg and related topics. The Jackson List archive site is http://thejacksonlist.com/.  To subscribe, email me at barrettj@stjohns.edu. Thank you for your interest, and for spreading the word.

Iran-Contra Criminal Charges Pertaining to Iran and the Contras

On August 8th, former White House Counsel and former U.S. Ambassador C. Boyden Gray wrote, in a Wall Street Journal op-ed piece, that in the Iran-Contra criminal investigation, “no one was convicted or even indicted for any action pertaining to Iran or the Contras.”

This statement is incorrect, and on August 10th I sent the WSJ a letter spelling that out.

Because the Journal hasn’t published my letter, and because I’m pro-facts, I post it here:

Editor, The Wall Street Journal

1211 Avenue of the Americas

New York, NY  10036

To the Editor:

Former White House Counsel C. Boyden Gray has misremembered the facts of Iran-Contra, on which we each worked, sometimes as counterparts.

Mr. Gray wrote (“Mueller Can Avoid an Iran-Contra Repeat,” Aug. 8) that “no one was convicted or even indicted for any action pertaining to Iran or the Contras.”

In fact, a federal grand jury charged former National Security Adviser John Poindexter, his aide Lt. Col. Oliver North, and two others with multiple felonies pertaining to both Iran and the Contras.  Count One in that indictment charged that they had engaged in a conspiracy to defraud the United States in three respects: (1) by deceitfully supporting the Contra war in Nicaragua in defiance of congressional controls; (2) by using U.S. arms sales to Iran to raise funds for Poindexter and North, rather than the U.S. Government, to spend; and (3) by pursuing unauthorized operations in Iran that endangered U.S. efforts to rescue Americans held hostage in Lebanon.  Count Two charged that the defendants had stolen U.S. government property (Iran arms sales proceeds).  Count Three charged that they had committed wire fraud in their transmissions of those proceeds.

Although the trial judge upheld the legal validity of the first two charges (dismissing the third as duplicative), the prosecutor, Independent Counsel Lawrence Walsh, for whom I worked, ultimately agreed to dismiss them after Presidents Reagan and George H.W. Bush, whom Mr. Gray served as Counsel, would not declassify information that the judge had ruled the defendants were entitled to use in their defense.

Sincerely,

John Q. Barrett

Professor of Law, St. John’s University

Associate Counsel, Office of Independent Counsel Lawrence E. Walsh, 1988-1993

 

Lecture, “Justice Jackson and His Brethren”

 

Here’s video of the lecture that I gave at Chautauqua Institution on July 28, 2017.

This was the final lecture in Chautauqua’s week of lectures on the general theme, “The Supreme Court: At a Tipping Point?” Other lecturers during the week were Linda Greenhouse, Annette Gordon-Reed, Peter Onuf, Jeffrey Rosen, Akhil Reed Amar, Rev. Eugene Robinson, and Theodore B. Olson.

For the Chautauquan Daily’s lecture preview article, click here.

And here’s video of the my Q&A with audience members following the lecture: