Tag Archives: Jamestown

Jackson List: Executive Director search, Robert H. Jackson Center

This post is a brief, very important advertisement.

The Robert H. Jackson Center (www.roberthjackson.org), located in Jamestown, New York, is searching for its next leader.  The position description is below.  Please consider applying if you are a strong prospect, and please share this in your networks with others who should be interested in this opportunity.  Applicants should contact the Jackson Center by email, at info@roberthjackson.org.

Thank you very much for your interest and assistance.  We know that teaching, ever better and more widely, the life, work, and legacies of Robert H. Jackson truly matters.


The Robert H. Jackson Center

Executive Director Position Description

Position Summary

The Executive Director is the senior executive and public face of the Robert H Jackson Center (Center) and must be able to articulate the Center’s mission, enduring relevance, values, and work. The Executive Director must inspire, guide, and support the Center’s staff, while marshaling its resources to preserve, promote, and advance the legacy of Robert H. Jackson through education, exhibits, and archives.  Reporting to the Board of Directors (Board), the Executive Director will have overall strategic and operational responsibility for the Center’s staff, programs, fiscal management, fundraising, and execution of its mission.

Duties and Responsibilities

Fundraising & Communications

Spearhead revenue generating and fundraising activities to support high quality programs, facility, and staff expenses. The Executive Director shall lead these efforts with staff and Board support.

  • Articulate the Center’s mission, importance, goals and impact to various stakeholders including: donors, foundations, partner organizations, Board members, staff, volunteers, and general audiences.
  • Identify, cultivate and solicit prospective donors.
  • Identify organizations and foundations with the potential to provide significant financial support, cultivate the relationships, and oversee proposal submissions.
  • Foster partnerships with academic, legal, government, business, and other non-profit institutions.
  • Work with staff, Board, volunteers, and stakeholders to develop and implement fundraising activities.

Leadership & Management

Ensure, by effective leadership and management, that the day-to-day operations and activities of the Center are efficiently administered and that the organization is fiscally responsible with balanced budgets, attainable revenue projections, and financial stability. Advance the Center’s programmatic excellence. Protect and develop the archives. The Executive Director shall lead these efforts with support from all staff.

  • Establish goals and ensure effective systems to accomplish key objectives in the strategic plan. Track progress, regularly evaluate program components, recommend timelines and resources needed to achieve the strategic goals, and report on these quarterly to the Board.
  • Serve as a trusted steward of all Center finances and assets. Prepare the annual operating and capital budget for approval by the Board. Report quarterly on the operating budget.
  • Oversee all activities associated with the Board, including staffing for all Board and committee meetings, meeting schedules, locations, development of agenda, and meeting materials. Identify, assess, and inform the Board of internal and external issues that affect the Center.
  • Work closely with staff and  Board to ensure that the Center has the necessary human resources to support ongoing and planned programs and fiscal growth plans as they are developed. Establish and maintain open lines of communication with the staff and ensure a level of professionalism and teamwork across the organization.  Supervise, motivate, empower, and delegate appropriate responsibility among staff members.
  • Oversee the development and implementation of educational programs for the general public, academic programs for area educators and schools, and scholarly use of the archives.

The Executive Director’s near-term (12-18 month) priorities include:

  • Develop a deep knowledge of current fundraising, core programs, staff responsibilities, operations, and business plans.
  • Become the face and voice of the Center. Learn about Robert H. Jackson and be able to effectively promote his legacy as well as the Center’s programs and objectives.
  • Develop a multi-year operating budget, including additional staff positions.
  • Develop a multi-year fundraising plan.
  • Develop a strategic plan in partnership with the Board.
  • Lead, manage, and strengthen organizational and program growth.
  • Plan, along with the Board Chair, a Board retreat.
  • Administer the execution of the facility renovations resulting from the New York State Downtown Revitalization Initiative (DRI) grant

Qualifications and Experience

All candidates should have proven leadership, coaching and relationship management experience. Concrete demonstrable experience and other qualifications include:

  • Ideally an advanced degree with at least 5 years of senior management and non-profit experience.
  • Track record as an enthusiastic and entrepreneurial fundraiser with measurable results in identifying, cultivating, and soliciting major donors, foundation, government and corporate support, and generating other sources of revenue, and success in launching and completing a capital campaign or similar fundraising initiative.
  • Track record of effectively leading and scaling an organization and staff, including examples of having taken an organization to the next stage of growth.
  • Solid, hands-on budget management skills, including budget preparation, analysis, decision-making and reporting.
  • Strong organizational abilities including planning, delegating, program development and task facilitation, and demonstrated ability to oversee and collaborate with staff.
  • Ability to convey a vision of the Center’s strategic future to staff, Board, volunteers and donors.
  • Ability to assess situations to determine importance, urgency and risks, and to make clear decisions which are timely and in the best interests of the organization.
  • Skills to collaborate with and motivate Board members and other volunteers.
  • Strong writing and public speaking skills.

Compensation

  • Base compensation based on professional experience and current market rates.
  • Reasonable salary increases based on performance.
  • Potential for bonus based on exceeding fundraising goals.

This post was emailed to the Jackson List, a private but entirely non-selective email list that reaches many thousands of subscribers around the world. I write to it periodically about Justice Robert H. Jackson, the Supreme Court, Nuremberg and related topics. The Jackson List archive site is http://thejacksonlist.com/.  To subscribe, email me at barrettj@stjohns.edu. Thank you for your interest, and for spreading the word.

Jackson List: Hospital Birth (1919)

In 1911, Robert H. Jackson, a law student, met Irene A. Gerhardt, a state government secretary, in Albany, New York.  They dated during that academic year while Robert, a senior at Albany Law School, completed its program.

In summer 1912, Robert returned to Jamestown in western New York State, the city where he had already begun to establish himself.  After he became a lawyer in 1913, he built his law practice there.  He saved money to buy a house and courted Irene by letter and occasional visits.

In 1916, Robert and Irene Jackson married in Albany and then made Jamestown their home.  Within months, however, he was recruited to practice law with a prominent law firm in Buffalo.  So they moved to an apartment and lived there for the next two years.

It seems that while Robert practiced law in Jamestown and in Buffalo, Irene assisted him a bit but was not employed outside the home.  Although she was a quiet person and new to western New York, she made friends and got involved in community activities.

In Fall 1918, Robert Jackson was recruited back to Jamestown to serve as corporation counsel (the city’s attorney).  At about that same time, Irene became pregnant.

That brings us to today, July 19th.  On this date in 1919, the Jacksons became parents.  Their son William Eldred Jackson, named for Robert’s late father, was born on Saturday, July 19, 1919, in Jamestown’s WCA Hospital.

More than three decades later, Robert—by then Justice Jackson—recorded these thoughts, which are focused quite a bit on finances, about the July 1919 passage in his life:

When Bill was born I had a sense of getting a great deal more credit for it than I had earned and a certain sense of the vastness of new obligations.  I took out additional insurance.  I felt an interest in the public schools and the future of the community that I hadn’t quite so keenly felt before.  Generally I behaved as one, I suppose, who had given hostages to fortune.  I also felt that my wife was more helpless.  Up to that time I had felt that if anything happened to me, she could take care of herself quite readily, but encumbered by a child I felt that she was entitled to added protection, which I tried to provide by way of insurance.  I don’t know that I analyzed my feelings too deeply because I was pretty busy practicing law and taking care of my responsibilities.

Having a family, I suppose, was a new kind of burden for me, but I can’t say that I ever was really burdened.  I didn’t have much money, but never in my professional life was there a time when I had any problem about meeting my office rent or any obligations.  I was careful about not incurring them if I couldn’t meet them.  Somehow or other I always managed to be ahead of my obligations.  That was one of the things that my father taught me and made very emphatic.  My credit rating was always first-class in the local stores and banks.  I never had any difficulty with financial matters.

My son was not born at home.  That was a departure from anything that ever happened in my family.  My two sisters and a brother who didn’t live had all been born at home.  That was the accepted thing as far as I knew.  But the doctor said my wife should go to the hospital, so hospital it was.

Bill Jackson, whom I had the great fortune to know, became a gifted writer and lawyer.  He was, as a U.S. Navy officer, his father’s executive assistant in the prosecution of Nazi war criminals at Nuremberg during 1945-1946.  He spent his career practicing law at a leading international law firm, Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy.  And he was, proudly, a father.

In this photograph, taken when Bill was about one year old, he sits in his father’s lap.

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This post was emailed to the Jackson List, a private but entirely non-selective email list that reaches many thousands of subscribers around the world. I write to it periodically about Justice Robert H. Jackson, the Supreme Court, Nuremberg and related topics. The Jackson List archive site is http://thejacksonlist.com/.  To subscribe, email me at barrettj@stjohns.edu. Thank you for your interest, and for spreading the word.

Jackson List: A Doctor’s Thanksgiving Wisdom (1953)

Robert H. Jackson lived actively, vigorously, despite knowing of his family’s history of heart disease.  His father, Will Jackson, died in 1915 at age 52, apparently of heart trouble.  Other members of the Jackson clan had heart problems too.  One of his sisters, having “had three quite bad spells with [her] heart” when she was only 34, referred with some fatalism to the possibility of having “a Jackson heart.”  Robert Jackson might have had his first heart attack as early as January 1941, when he was 48 years old.  His medical care attended to his heart from at least then until the end of his life (1954).

In 1934, when Robert Jackson was forty-one years old, he was appointed to national office for the first time and moved to Washington, D.C.  But his extended family and many of his closest friends remained in and around his adult hometown, Jamestown, New York.  They were the people who, and western New York State was the land and region that, Jackson loved—if you’ll excuse a line, he left his heart…  So he returned there regularly to visit, at least a few times every year.

And Jackson kept his Jamestown doctor.  Dr. Samuel Hurwitz, M.D., was a general practitioner with skills in cardiology.  Jackson liked and trusted Dr. Hurwitz and saw him each year.  He was attentive to Jackson, prescribing various medicines (bellergal; aminophyllin; nitroglycerin) that Jackson took as needed.  They corresponded during periods between Jackson’s Jamestown visits.

In November 1953, Jackson sent word to Dr. Hurwitz, probably by letter, that he needed prescription refills.  Hurwitz wrote back, enclosing signed prescriptions, noting “I have omitted the [patient] name and date, which you can put in when ready to fill the Rx’s.”

Dr. Hurwitz also noted his awareness of Jackson’s extrajudicial endeavors, which then included his well-publicized November 2, 1953, keynote speech at the dedication of the American Bar Center at the University of Chicago.  “The Jamestown papers follow and report your travels,” Dr. Hurwitz wrote.  “All of us applaud your philosophy.”

Dr. Hurwitz closed his November 1953 note to Justice Jackson, written on Thanksgiving Day, with a modest, I think admirable, nod to the role of fortune, and perhaps the role of higher power, in every life:

On this day anyone should be thankful for all the good he has, which are none of his doing.

I hope that your life is filled with good, as mine is—Happy Thanksgiving.

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This post was emailed to the Jackson List, a private but entirely non-selective email list that reaches many thousands of subscribers around the world. I write to it periodically about Justice Robert H. Jackson, the Supreme Court, Nuremberg and related topics. The Jackson List archive site is http://thejacksonlist.com/.  To subscribe, email me at barrettj@stjohns.edu. Thank you for your interest, and for spreading the word.

Jackson List: Voting for the Last Time (1940)

In early 1940, President Franklin D. Roosevelt was planning, at least to some degree, to return to private life after two terms in office.  Robert H. Jackson was F.D.R.’s newly-appointed United States Attorney General.  Jackson also was, according to private remarks by the President and many New Dealers, and thus according to many press reports that were trial balloons, F.D.R.’s choice to succeed him as the Democratic Party’s presidential nominee, and then in the White House.

Events took other courses.  Many, including very publicly Jackson, urged Roosevelt to seek a third term.  In springtime, Nazi Germany invaded and soon conquered the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, and France.  In late June, the Republican Party nominated businessman Wendell Willkie as its presidential candidate.  In July, the Democrats nominated, again, Roosevelt.

That fall, Attorney General Jackson took numerous short trips away from his Washington work to campaign actively—as was legally permitted then—for the President and other Democratic candidates.  In early October, for example, Jackson spoke to a large crowd in Buffalo, New York, once his home.  In this speech, Jackson decried Willkie’s phoniness, noting that “only when he talked to workmen did he find profanity and vulgarity in order,” which lost him “any opportunity he ever had to create anything like unity among the American people.”  In mid-October, Jackson gave a law and politics address in Boston.  Later that month he travelled to Jamestown, New York, his adult hometown, to speak alongside U.S. Senator Robert F. Wagner (NY) at a large Democratic Party rally.  Jackson also spoke that month in Richmond, Virginia, and a number of times from Washington on nationwide radio broadcasts.  In the first days of November, Jackson travelled back to New York State to give political speeches in Binghamton and in Yonkers.

And then, finally, it was time to vote.  On Monday, November 4, 1940, Robert and Irene Jackson travelled from Washington, where they lived in a rented Wardman Park apartment, to Jamestown, where they still owned a house and were registered to vote.  They voted in Jamestown on Tuesday, November 5, 1940—both for Roosevelt and his running mate Henry Wallace, I’m sure.

In Jamestown at that time, Democrats such as the Jacksons were a political minority and usually their candidates lost.  That was true in 1940.  Willkie carried Jamestown by over 1,500 votes, and he won all of Chautauqua County, where Jamestown is located.  Indeed, Republicans across the county won every race.

But that was not true statewide.  Although the race was tight, Roosevelt carried New York State, his home, with 50.5% of the vote.

Nationwide, the race was not so close.  F.D.R. won 54.7% of the popular vote, to Willkie’s 44.8%.  Overall, Roosevelt carried 38 of the 48 States.  He was reelected with 449 electoral votes to Willkie’s 82.

In the new year, President Roosevelt was inaugurated, beginning his unprecedented third term.

Wendell Willkie, to his great credit, went to work for President Roosevelt as an international emissary and adviser.

In July 1941, Robert Jackson also took on a new government position—he was appointed by Roosevelt and confirmed by the Senate to serve as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, and thus he resigned his position as Attorney General.

Justice Jackson of course cast many, many votes in the Supreme Court’s conference room, on cases, petitions, and other judicial matters.

But he never again entered a voting booth.  In his view, holding judicial office was a responsibility not to be involved in politics, even at the private level of voting.

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This post was emailed to the Jackson List, a private but entirely non-selective email list that reaches many thousands of subscribers around the world. I write to it periodically about Justice Robert H. Jackson, the Supreme Court, Nuremberg and related topics. The Jackson List archive site is http://thejacksonlist.com/.  To subscribe, email me at barrettj@stjohns.edu. Thank you for your interest, and for spreading the word.

Jackson List: President Eisenhower & Justice Jackson’s Funeral (1954)

This post, tweaked and with some citation footnotes added, now is on the Jackson List archive site in “book look” PDF file form.

Jackson List: Messages for Democrats (August 1940)

This post, including a historic postcard image of Celoron’s Pier Ball Room, now is on the Jackson List archive site in “book look” PDF file form.

Jackson List: Political Summer (1938)

This post, tweaked a little and containing a photo image and footnotes, now is on the Jackson List archive site in “book look” PDF file form.